Use ffmpeg to merge multiple avi files

October 25, 2011 Leave a comment
cat avi1.avi avi2.avi avix.avi > avi_all.avi
ffmpeg -i avi_all.avi -acodec copy -vcodec copy avi_all_reindexed.avi
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Categories: unix Tags: ,

Split a video file on the command line

October 13, 2011 Leave a comment

Since it’s so insanely useful and installing/using the common graphical video editors is pretty much a pita:

ffmpeg -ss 00:15:00.0 -t 00:10:0.0 -i <source>.foo -vcodec copy -acodec copy <destination>.foo

Above command clips everything to the 15 minute mark, puts the following 10 minutes into the destination file and then clips everything after that.
If you leave out the -t parameter, everything from the -ss mark to the end gets copied to the destination file. Useful and fast.

Categories: unix Tags: , ,

Merge subtitles into a Matroska container on the command line

October 11, 2011 2 comments

Actually pretty darn easy – surely faster than using the GUI.

mkvmerge -o <output>.mkv --default-track 0 --language 0:<language> <subtitles>.srt <input>

You can list the language codes by invoking mkvmerge with the --list-languages (e.g. eng for English, ger for German) parameter. The --default-track parameter just sets the newly muxed subtitles as default for the player to use. If you are muxing multiple subtitles, you of course have to change the language code preceding number.

Categories: unix Tags: , ,

Life Changing Chrome Extension Of The Month: Hover Zoom

Seriously, it’s that good. What Hover Zoom by Romain Vallet does? It ‘simply’ loads the images behind little thumbnails and displays them in an overlay frame.

Hover Zoom on Google Images

Sounds simple? I’m sure it isn’t, even more so if you look at the supported sites:

 • Amazon		• Last.fm			• 4chan
 • Baidu (百度)		• MySpace			• Reddit
 • deviantART		• Picasa Web Albums	        • Imgur
 • eBay			• Twitter			• Panoramio
 • Facebook		• Wikipedia			• Fotolog
 • Flickr		• Windows Live Photos	        • VKontakte (ВКонтакте)
 • Google Images	• Yahoo				• YouTube
 • Google+ 		• WordPress

Apart from these officially supported sites, I found Hover Zoom working well for quite a lot of other websites on which it ‘just works’.

The author has done an amazing jobs keeping the extension really simple and unobtrusive, with options for whitelisting certain sites, adjustable delay and fading effects and zoom on keyhold. It even displays captions below the zoomed image if it’s able to catch one. This is the kind of extension that’s hard to describe, but once you’ve installed it you are going to miss it on any browser that doesn’t have it.

Hover Zoom on Flickr Hover Zoom on Facebook

Hover Zoom is available from the Chrome Web Store.

Categories: web Tags: , , , ,

Ever wondered what font’s being used on a webpage?

I certainly have. And it bugged me to no ends having to look for the CSS and then maybe, just maybe find what font family’s being used. Sure, FireBug and the integrated Chrome Developer Tools eased that process somewhat, but still… well, no more. I wish I’d known earlier that the fabulous WhatFont existed. It’s a Bookmarklet/Chrome Extension/Safari Extension that basically sits somewhere until you click it. You can then hover over any text and it tells you what font’s being used to display it. If you click you get additional information about the font service used, size etc. etc. Invaluable!

Screenshot shows the Chrome Extension.

Categories: web Tags: , ,

Switching your default Sans/Sans Serif/Monospace Fonts 2.5

And another update on my quest to a great .fonts.conf configuration, update from my updated-original post.

All stuff still applies, but newer freetype/fontconfig builds now support the Byte Code Interpreter, which provides a truly great font experience in combination with good fonts (*cough* hint: ChromeOS Fonts *cough*). My updated .fonts.conf is as follows (enabled BCI, enabled Sub-Pixel Rendering, enabled LCDFilter):

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<!--?xml version="1.0"?>-->
<!--DOCTYPE fontconfig SYSTEM "fonts.dtd">-->
<!-- ~/.fonts.conf for per-user font configuration -->
<fontconfig>
  <!-- Alias commonly used default names -->
  <!-- serif, sans-serif, sans and monospace -->
  <!-- to the ChromeOS fonts -->
  <alias>
    <family>serif</family>
    <prefer>
      <family>Tinos</family>
    </prefer>
  </alias>
  <alias>
    <family>sans-serif</family>
    <prefer>
      <family>Arimo</family>
    </prefer>
  </alias>
  <alias>
    <family>sans</family>
    <prefer>
      <family>Arimo</family>
    </prefer>
  </alias>
  <alias>
    <family>monospace</family>
    <prefer>
      <family>Cousine</family>
    </prefer>
  </alias>
  <!-- Replace Arial, Times New Roman, Verdana and Courier New -->
  <!-- with their counterparts. Strong binding used to override -->
  <!-- distribution defaults -->
  <match target="pattern" name="family">
    <test name="family" qual="any">
      <string>Arial</string>
    </test>
    <edit name="family" mode="assign" binding="strong">
      <string>Arimo</string>
    </edit>
  </match>
  <match target="pattern" name="family">
    <test name="family" qual="any">
      <string>Times New Roman</string>
    </test>
    <edit name="family" mode="assign" binding="strong">
      <string>Tinos</string>
    </edit>
  </match>
  <match target="pattern" name="family">
    <test name="family" qual="any">
      <string>Verdana</string>
    </test>
    <edit name="family" mode="assign" binding="strong">
      <string>Arimo</string>
    </edit>
  </match>
  <match target="pattern" name="family">
    <test name="family" qual="any">
      <string>Courier New</string>
    </test>
    <edit name="family" mode="assign" binding="strong">
      <string>Cousine</string>
    </edit>
  </match>
  <match target="pattern" name="family">
    <test name="family" qual="any">
      <string>Courier</string>
    </test>
    <edit name="family" mode="assign" binding="strong">
      <string>Cousine</string>
    </edit>
  </match>
  <match target="font">
    <!--    BCI Hinting     -->
    <edit name="hinting" mode="assign">
      <bool>true</bool>
    </edit>
    <edit name="hintstyle" mode="assign">
      <const>hintfull</const>
    </edit>
    <edit name="rgba" mode="assign">
      <const>rgb</const>
    </edit>
    <edit mode="assign" name="lcdfilter">
      <const>lcddefault</const>
    </edit>
    <!--    Auto Hinting, BCI works better for me 
        Your mileage may vary 
-->
    <!--
        <edit name="autohint" mode="assign">
                <bool>true</bool>
            </edit> 
        <edit name="hintstyle" mode="assign">
                <const>hintmedium</const>
            </edit>
-->
    <!--    Turn off Autohinting for bold fonts -->
    <!--
    <match> 
        <test name="weight" compare="more">
                <const>medium</const>
                </test>
        <edit name="autohint" mode="assign">
                <bool>false</bool>
               </edit>
       </match>
-->
  </match>
</fontconfig>

I am now truly satisfied on my Arch Linux box – while Ubuntu might have the best font experience out of the box, an equal experience on any decent modern distribution is just a configuration file and some great fonts away.

Categories: archlinux, linux, uncategorized Tags: ,

If I had one wish this year…

… it would be Spotify officially available in Germany. The software (hello wireless iPhone syncing!) and the service is so good, it’s hard to live without once you experienced it. Maybe Apple will introduce something reasonably priced… it will still come with the monster that is called iTunes. And it sucks.

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